How to keep perspective and hope?

The view from the mountain

On this Shabbat evening and the evening of Shavuot holiday, beginning tomorrow night, we continue to strive for peace and the next level of reconciliation among all people. We resolve to not give up on working toward making the world better for all inhabitants. On Shavuot we celebrate the giving of the Torah on Mt. Sinai. We glimpse from the high point and ask not to shrink our hope into the painful details and despair. We respond with kindness and contemplate wisdom. 

Sad about the violence in Tel Aviv I am reminded how fragile is the calm and our sense of freedom. I’m also encouraged by how caring, courageous and resilient the response has been. I reach to one of the luminaries of Jewish thought, Professor Yeshayahu Leibowitz z’l for inspiration.

He taught there is no religious meaning in history. There is only an endless struggle for justice with a desire to help alleviate human suffering and fight against natural disasters and human made disasters. This endless effort gives our lives meaning. The human courage and ingenuity to invent and reinvent ourselves, endlessly, is the story of history. We are all in this eternal process together.

Thankfully, the impulse to help is greater than the urge to destroy. We mostly focus on the good.

May we resolve to be the champions of peace in the eternal struggle for the good. May we choose inclusive over exclusive as we remember our deep interconnectedness. May we hold up caring for all humans over religious righteousness which separates and causes us more suffering than we inevitably and naturally have to endure. 

Listen to Professor Yeshayahu Leibowitz in his own words here: clip

Labor day weekend September 2-5 Retreat at Kripalu with Rabbi Sigal Inspire Your Heart Kabbalah of Turning and Returning

Playing Hide and Seek

How long have you been hiding your dreams and aliveness?

What desires are you denying yourself?

What are you afraid of?
Spring is a time to stop hiding and take a leap of faith. Look at nature around you and see how trees bloom and bulbs sprout without any effort or angsts. To spring forward like flowers do, we need to trust and not let worries and fears stop us. Think for a moment: What have I really wanted to do, but held back because of one reason or another, which stopped me from living fully and from fulfilling my dreams?
Revealing and concealing play important roles in our lives, in our stories and traditions. Life is a mystery and that is what makes it interesting. God and spirit are also unknown and they are too interesting because of that. Mysterious elements in all things keep us curious, engaged and yep, also guessing and amazed.
This week we celebrate the holiday of Purim (Thursday March 24) and read the story about Queen Esther (her name means hidden.) We dress up in costumes, which are revealing and hiding somethings about ourselves at the same time. This year, it also happened Easter is this weekend; marking the resurrection of Jesus and children will be looking for hidden colorful eggs with hidden sweets.
In both holidays we tell stories about hiddenness and salvation. The experiences of being lost, hidden and in despair are met with being found and saved. We can all relate to this motif. We all want to be found, seen, and live authentically and freely, but fears may stop us. In our spiritual seeking, and seeking friends, connections and meaning we long to be found. We long  to stop feeling separated and we want to stop hiding. The stories we celebrate this week can be helpful to us if we explore them as myths about human needs and conditions. The spirit is hidden and the storeis focus on the human side, not on God.
Life, turns out, is a mystery. The hidden and the revealed are playfully woven together. On Purim we can let what we usually hold back be more in the forefront. Playfully and temporarily we enjoy showing some of what is hidden. What can you playfully reveal about you, your life, your ideas and dreams? What will make you laugh if you trusted and revealed some of the mystery you are?  

Welcome to Purim: Happiness is Served

A holiday dedicated to happiness and fun? Yes!
On Purim we are “commanded” to be happy and have fun. But what if we don’t feel like it? I think that is why it is a “commandment.” So we do it even when, or especially when, we don’t feel happy. It is a practice!
I have shared about setting the right conditions for living the life we want, instead of setting goals. Happiness is closely relates to it and works in a similar way. Setting the conditions and having reminders for happiness in place are key to experiencing happiness.
We know from studies that smiling and laughing, even for no reason at all, changes how we feel. When we smile and laugh we set the physical, chemical, and neural conditions to feeling happier. 
Purim is an interesting combination of fun and masquerading. It works because freeing ourselves to be playful, in how we dress and behave on Purim, sets the conditions to silliness and giddiness, and that in turns contributes to more happiness and encourages more freedom of expression. Freedom of expression goes together with feeling authentic and opens us to more joy and fun. The reciprocal flow goes in both directions; allowing more playfulness brings about more joy and more joy encourages more freedom to be playful.

Awaken Passion & Aliveness

The commercial presentation of Valentine’s Day, or what I like to call remembering love day, can be fun, but it can also make some feel bad, left out and unloved if they don’t participate in the giving and receiving of bonbons and roses. On top of that, for many, feeling aliveness in relationships is fading, if not completely absent. Many people are indifferent to the holiday and let it happen around them avoiding or rejecting the whole thing. I like remembering love day, but I wish we used it to feed our soul and aliveness much better, instead of let it pass us by uneventfully.

How about instead of the same old chocolates and flowers we use the occasion of Valentine’s Day to awaken real passion and aliveness? And I do not mean just the romantic kind.

Perhaps when we see the landscape covered with pink and red for Valentine’s Day we can find a way to go beyond the symbols of the day to express love in a larger way. Can we free ourselves and color outside the pink and red lines with different colors and ideas to awaken our unique individual passions?

Imagine how it would be if you engaged with curiosity and use the day, or even take the whole week, to inquire about your state of passion and aliveness. Find out how you can awaken your aliveness; the desire of the body-mind to really live! How to come alive to deeply engage, feel, express and connect.

Aliveness is the experience of being truly alive in all relationships and not just romantic ones. Relating to one’s self and self-loving comes first. All other relationships are affected by how we are with ourselves. We can use Valentine’s Day to ignite the inner light, to empower and propel our lives and be more fully alive in all our relationships.

The invitation is to let remembering love day evoke a desire in us to become alive in all we do. This week, let the passion in the heart be free and the imagination open, to remember your aliveness.

Let yourself find new ways to awaken your passion, your enthusiasm and excitement to discover more of who you are and what you love in the ever-expanding field of your aliveness.

Happy love day!

Mentoring

Retreats at Kripalu Center. MA in March & September

Instead of setting goals, set the right conditions

Set the right conditions to manifest your heart’s desires

On a retreat the conditions are set perfectly right for reflection, contemplation and transformation. I am back from magical week at Kripalu Center in MA where I taught two meditative and empowering retreats. The biggest learning we can gain from a retreat, after we open to our own heart’s desire, and understand why we want to make changes, is how to set the conditions for such desires to successfully unfold into our lives.

Participants’ feedback notes with reflections about the retreats touch my heart. They read more like love letters with a renewed awareness of self love and care. Thank you all for your courage to open your hearts to yourselves, each other, and the teachings.

conditions

The Teachings:

No matter how profound the “ah ha” moment is or how clear are the insights, those seeds will take root and grow only if the proper conditions and environment are provided. The conditions we provide for the seeds will determine if they will live and thrive or be forgotten.

Although it is very important, the call of the heart’s desire is only the beginning. It points and guides the way to loving self-care, giving proper attention, and cultivating nourishing behaviors and practices so the seeds can grow. Unless we listen to the call of the heart and commit to take the steps and actions to fulfill it, noting will begin to change.

Take small steps toward self love and care.

Remember why you are doing what you are doing and structure practices to support you living the lifestyle that supports living from your heart. Resolve to keep your commitments through the laziness, negative thoughts, discomfort, forgetting, and resistance. It takes time to create new habits. Make small, measurable and reachable targets so you can reach them and build on your success.

Use tools of remembering; wear a Zigizen necklace with a daily affirmation close to your heart, and set an alarm every hour to breath relaxing breaths for a minute.

Develop new supportive habits; taking walks, listening to, or reading, inspiring ideas, keep a gratitude list, meditate for 10 minutes twice a day, resolve to take 3 yoga classes a week, and eat well.

May you remember your heart’s desire and allow it to guide your life, and may the commitment and effort you invest in setting the right conditions bring about the effect you desire in your life. May joy and ease abound.

Mentoring individual and small groups 

Join us at next retreat at Kripalu Center in Mass USA

 Kabbalah Retreats for Ease and Contentment

New with Rabbi Sigal in 2016:

Online meditation groups – let us know if you are interested

Mini retreats in NYC, Philadelphia, & other locations – More details are forthcoming

RESOURCES:

Zigizen Necklaces  Amazon.com

Hebrew and English chants, Rabbi Sigal’s CDs to support your practice